Cadmium Contamination: Children’s Necklaces Sold at Wal-Mart Recalled

About 55,000 children’s necklaces sold at Wal-Mart stores are being recalled because they contain high levels of cadmium, according to a news report in consumeraffairs.com. Cadmium is a toxic metal listed high on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) list of substances most harmful to the environment. Cadmium is toxic when ingested by young children and can cause several adverse health effects including brain, kidney, lung and bone damage.

These defective products, which were manufactured in China, were sold exclusively in Wal-Mart retail stores across the country from November 2009 through January 2010 for about $5. The recalled jewelry is in the shape of a metal crown or frog pendant on a metal link chain necklace in a crown hinged box. If you have one of these necklaces at home, please take it away from your child and return the product to Wal-Mart to obtain a full refund.

Although federal officials have issued stringent safety standards for lead content in children’s toys, they have not addressed this important issue with cadmium quite yet. Recent news reports indicate that Chinese manufacturers are using cadmium in children’s jewelry and toys to make them look brighter. But when young children, who tend to suck on or bite their toys, ingest cadmium, it can have devastating consequences similarly caused by lead, if not worse.

If your child has suffered adverse health effects because of cadmium-contaminated children’s products, please contact an experienced Seattle products liability attorney with The Bernard Law Group for a FREE, comprehensive and completely confidential consultation. Please call us at 1-800-418-8282 or e-mail us at info@bernardlawgroup.com. We can also send you our FREE informational brochure about Washington product defect cases, which has useful, educational information to help you understand your rights. Get in touch with Kirk Bernard and his skilled legal team today.

Source: http://www.consumeraffairs.com/recalls04/2010/faf.html